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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
for george w. bush. -- requests for george w. bush. i do not think we ever interviewed with him. he may have been interviewed once. but there is always -- the rules of the game, to request an interview with the president, whoever it may be. the obama people and obama himself like to get on the air. >> it has got a bigger audience than any other -- >> pretty much. you certainly get access to and engaged part of the population. >> do you ever worry about being the used? >> of course. you always worry about being used, but the presumption always is that at the same time you are using them. we're not going to be patsies for any administration, and i do not think we ever have been. >> i want to run video of don hewitt. how many years to do know him? >> i knew him from the very beginning of my life at cbs, 1964. he was the executive producer of cbs evening news, the cronkite news, when i joined. shortly after he was fired, and was in a kind of limbo or siberia for a couple of years. i did a documentary for them in 1968. don was the nominal executive producer. so i have known him for a long time. w
in the debate preps with governor george w. bush in 2000, i did that. and governor bush's reaction was of course, he's not going to do that. that's ridiculous. >> but can he get things done? >> that's exactly what gore did. >> and i believe i can. >> did he practice a nod or did you just -- warn him he was going to physically approach him. >> i think the point is that governor bush was ready for it and that was not a high point for vice president gore. >> that's fascinating, that they knew gore was going to try to sort of physically approach him. >> that's right. as senator portman said, it's because he spent so much time studying al gore at the time, studying his debates with bill bradley's from the primaries that year. really invaded his personal space. >> it's all about research. we know how governor romney has been preparing the las couple of days. how does he prepare in these last hours or last day or so? >> we're told tonight he went to the cheesecake factory with his sons and some grandchildren. his aides say in the hours before what is critical for him is to get into the green room, to b
forward to 1982. george h.w. bush was on the ropes over bill clinton when casper weinberger was imply indicated in the iran/contra scandal shortly before election day. bad news for bush that he did not need. in 2004 a classic october surprise. osama bin laden released a video on october 29th just four days before election day in a raz orthin race between president bush and john kerry. three years after 9/11 it served as a reminder of the terrorist threat and strategists in both parties believed helped president bush. more recently the term october surprise has come to mean a seismic event in the fall of an election year though most have centered around foreign policy others have been about the economy like in 2008. when the economy imploded, john mccain's advisers say his campaign collapsed along with it and never recovered. historians say in order for an october surprise to have a real 11th hour impact it has to feed into a narrative that already exist, whether it's carter's ineffectiveness or questions about mccain's credentials on the economy. >> it's not so much that suddenly eure
and george w.? would you do that. i'm just teasing. >> i don't see george bush as an anathema. >> would you bring him out for the big rallies in columbus. >> the president probably doesn't want to participate in this campaign. but there are some spots in town he could probably help. >> how would you like w. out there campaigning for the other guy. >> i strongly recommend to romney that he campaign everywhere with george w. bush. if you look at all the data, people still blame by a margin of two to one the economic problems in this country on bush. so i think -- and the other thing, by the way, it would open up for the president is the very clear case that if you didn't like the bush/cheney years, you wouldn't like the romney years because he has the same policies and the same advisers. >> but the difference is that the obama years haven't improved that much now, have they? >> the obama years are pretty -- we didn't go into a great depression -- >> this is what voters are deciding. it was worse under w. but it's not good enough better -- you didn't clean up the bush mess welloff. thank you.
office. she saw the busts and president george w. bush's office of dwight eisenhower and he kept the busts there throughout his eight year presidency as a texan and as somebody who recognized as his father did and the southerners did and as republicans did that the eisenhower presidency and 52 begins a dialogue that we have had ever since in which the position will wax and wane and there will be stronger arguments and weaker arguments at any given time that we have a robust are and we also have an effective public sector. and the republicans basically are advocates for the private sector and that is the connection. >> what is something we would know about president eisenhower as a farmer after he retired from public service or his public life? >> what would he know about him? something that we talk about in "going home to glory." i learned an early lesson i think in leadership that i articulated before he went i went to college and that is he was a leader and i saw the way people responded to him and understood that to be the case. i knew he was special but above all he was a lea
, but we will see about that. guest: ohio has the longest streak of voting for the winner. george w. bush won reelection in 2004 with ohio's electoral votes and carry it with 51% of the vote. president obamacare doh highfill with 52% of the vote. we will be looking at hamilton county on election night. president carried hamilton county, which is unusual for a democrat to do. republicans are very confident that he's not going to carry it again this year. the romney campaign believes that its numbers in those key areas of the state that you showed, he is outperforming john mccain by a wide margin. host: since 1948, only lyndon johnson, george mcgovern, and john kerry of performed in ohio compared to where they performed nationally. guest: yes. it is sort of what dan alluded to. the mix of rural and urban, white and black, male and female, all of it is a microcosm within the the tri-state. that's why it turns out to be such a good bellwether and such a good barometer of where the country is, year after year. -- it is a microcosm within the buckeye state. host: pennsylvania, michigan, even in
in george w. bush's administration. here is a part of his story in a campaign ad. let's watch. >> from the jungles of vietnam to life-saving rescues at home, rich carmona has always answered the call. in the senate he'll support our veterans because he's lived it. >> now, richard carmona has put the republican held arizona senate seat in play. democrats dearly want to hold on to the majority in the senate and flipping the seat held by retiring jon kyl would make it even harder for republicans to stop them. it would be a powerful symbol of the shifting politics in western states. >> joining me is now is richard carmona. it's an honor to have you on the show, sir. how do you handle -- how do you unify your state along ethnic lines between what we call anglos and latinos? how do you make the state feel whole? >> well, it's whole and home for me, chris, because i have been here over a quarter century. as you know, working in health care, working along the border, working as a police officer, working as a professor at the university. so the people know me and they consider me one of their o
it is the incumbent or the previous president on foreign policy. for example, george w. bush, he went and said that bill clinton was absolutely and completely wrong. he personalized our relationship with russia. that is a disaster and i'm going to be a realist and i am going to think about america and we will have a whole new idea. he looked into his eyes, vladimir putin and said [inaudible] defense collide. inbox changes. barack obama said he's going to sit down and negotiate with our enemies as well as her friends. and who outlined the new policy of engagement. reality simply did not permit it. he is running on many of the supporters of barack obama of 2008. >> host: here is the latest cover of who won the great recession. we will talk more about that this morning in a few moments. but first, here's a question coming in from tony on twitter. should a new approach be tried. for your answer, would share with the audience, one of your jobs as a co-chief along with your husband, peter baker, as part of the region of the world that you know well. >> guest: yes, we were there during vladimir putin
preaching judicial restraint. but citizens united was a case where just a few years earlier george w. bush had signed the mccain-feingold law. and just two years earlier the supreme court -- no, it was more than two, i think it was four years earlier -- the supreme court had affirmed the constitutionality of the mccain-feingold law. but in a story i tell at somewhat greater length in "the oath," the conservative majority converted a relatively minor dispute over an obscure film put out by a nonprofit corporation into a complete rewriting of our campaign finance laws based on the dual metaphors that corporations are people, and money is speech. and those two ideas are at the heart of, um, of citizens united, and and they are the story. and that decision is very much, um, the story of the 2012 presidential and perhaps even more importantly lower ballot races. .. is going to be overturned based on the oral arguments in part because in my experience roberts could this is not a court where they play a lot a lot of devils advocate. their usual argument, there are questions to, to make their case
to george w. bush, and i wrote a column about the four years she was in office. and it's my judgment that ann richards was an awfully good governor, and so i think i closed that column by saying, 'good on ya.' c-span: what makes you a good governor? >> guest: well, as i say, in our state we have the weak governor system, so that really not a great deal is required of the governor, not necessarily to know much or do much. and we've had a lot of governors who did neither. ann, i think, was one of our more effective governors, although in the odd way of american politics i'm--i'm not sure i could point to a whole lot that she actually got done. it was mostly a matter of keeping bad things from happening. and one of the main reasons she lost the governorship was because she vetoed the conceed handgun bill. and we've got a bunch of gun nuts in texas who are bound and determined that they should be able to march around with concealed weapons. c-span: what's a gun nut? >> guest: somebody who loves guns--loves guns; think that that's just the most important thing in the whole world. c-span:
advisers. we both covered the campaign of george w. bush when he was running early on projected he would have colin powell as secretary of state. he was flanked by henry kissinger and condoleezza rice and others to make him look like he was a foreign policy expert. >> on one hand you have john bolton who is a neo-conservative, considered very hard line. you have robert zoellick, a more realist. condoleezza rice has been advising kbofr romney and getting advice from george schultz. so that backs up the point that he's got a lot of people advising him on foreign policy and so he can be in either one of those camps if you were to look at his advisers. >> john dickerson, thank you. the former top security official for the u.s. ambassador to libya is testifying to congress this week. sharyl attkisson spoke with him on sunday. she's in washington with an interview you'll see only on cbs "this morning." good morning? >> reporter: good morning. andrew wood is a highly decorated specialist with the green beret. he met daily with u.s. ambassador christopher stevens who was killed along with three
h.w. bush was already on the ropes against bill clinton over a sluggish economy, when casper wineberger, former president ronald reagan's defense secretary, was implicated in the iran contrascandal shortly before election day. bad news that bush, who served as reagan's vice president, did not need. in 2004, a classic october surprise. osama bin laden released a video on october 29th, just four days before election day in a razor-thin race between president bush and john kerry. three years after 9/11, it served as a reminder of the terrorist threat and strategists in both parties believed helped president bush. more recently the term october surprise has come to mean a seismic event in the fall of an election year. though most have centered around foreign policy, others have been about the economy, like in 2008. when the economy imploded, john mccain's advisors say his campaign collapsed along with it and never recovered. historians say in order for an october surprise to have a real 11th hour impact, it has to feed into a narrative that already exists, whether it's carter's i
strike in pakistan, authorized by george w. bush. not a single drone strike has occurred outside the areas. that is one of the reasons i think he used the acquiescence in the strikes. i think there is acquiescence by the pakistan government. it would very quickly change if the drone strikes changed and other tribal regions. they are referred to as foreign area. constitutionally, the regions have never been part of pakistan proper. there would be huge push back if drone strikes started in -- pakistan has f-16s. there is some degree of acquiescence. the days of acquiescence in pakistan are fading, as you know. the united states has a 90% in april rating in pakistan. down about 20%. it was voted to essentially and the use of drones on the territory. the united states government has ignored that. there was a drone strike about once every 40 days under george w. bush. under obama, there has been a drone strike about once every four days. how do we assemble our data about drone strikes? we rely on pakistan and news sources, cnn, and also pakistan the newspapers happe. it is where many
by the presidential reelected george w. bush, three left-wing billionaires, george soros, peter lewis raise $200 million for a series of organizations together and try to defeat president bush. so this type of structure had been found for a long period of time. another thing gone on even longer with labor union participation, specifically democrats. in election after election, it is the biggest spending of the labor unions. and when karl rove and ed gillespie started looking at the 2010 elections, they realized that while big labor, which is $400 billion to a public president upon the 2008, there was no corollary that existed on the right to spend large amounts of money for house and senate. so karl rove smartly started american crossroads. it was interesting. i was working across her as an and president obama actually attacked carr wrote in february seeking a legal money from china, which was funny. as soon as he said that comeau we saw an uptick in america grassroots funding. the reason for that was president obama had identified us and we ended up shattering her fund raising goals by the 2010
to be commander in chief. >> mr. vice president, you have 30 seconds. >> well, i clearly believe that george w. bush would be a better commander in chief. he's already done it for four years and he's demonstrated without question the conviction, the vision, the determination to win this war against terror. he understands it's a global conflict that reaches from the united states all the way around the globe to jakarta. and those special quality -- qualities are vital in a commander in chief and i think the president has them and i'm not at all certain the opponent has. >> without mentioning them at all, explain to us why you are different from your opponent, starting with you, mr. vice president. >> i am different from john edwards. well, in some respects, i think probably there are more similarities than there are differences in our personal story. i don't talk about myself very much. but i've heard senator edwards and as i listen to him, i find similarities. i come from relatively modest circumstances. my grandfather never even went to high school. i'm the first in my family to graduate from
2000, news broke, george w. bush had been arrested for drunk driving, granted that happened way back in the '70s. how was he able to overcome that story so close to the election? >> well, you know, he can't really overcome it. he just didn't pay a high enough price. everybody will recall, of course, that he actually lost the popular vote in that race, even though he won the electoral vote. where as he was up by about five points before that story broke. i think it is pretty clear that that cost him some votes but didn't cost him quite enough to actually cost him the election. >> so, aaron, what is our october surprise? or have we already seen it? >> i don't know we have yet. some people are talking about the debate as the october surprise. some people are talking about the jobs report. i'm not sure either of those are really a huge game changing event in and of themselves. the beauty of the october surprise is that we don't know what it is before it happens. but a lot of times these things happen, have to do with foreign policy, obviously, the release of the osama bin laden tape in 2
in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and others are interested in his rhetoric. how much of it was involved in writing the speech but here is evidence of how intimately he was involved in the writing process draft after draft and he was striking things out to prepare his remarks in the senate floor proposing this in the 1990 legislat
race pitting governor george w. bush of texas against vice president al gore. it resulted from a rare combination of factors with demonstrating effects on mr. gore's campaign. and i guess the question is, can mitt romney pull something that would really kind of just give people a page-turner on, a, his personality, which he doesn't appear to really have one beyond being a really nice person. no, i'm serious. he has to show empathy and sympathy and a connection with people that he hasn't up until now. or, steve rattner, to be more specific about his policies, which many argue he hasn't been very specific nor paul ryan. >> he hasn't been very specific. but i think his bigger problem is the first one you said. that he's got to create some sense of connectivity or relationship with the voters. i think that's really his goal as well as what we were talking about in the earlier segment of trying to bring a clear depiction of obama's policies and the fact they haven't done everything they were supposed to. >> john harwood, can he do that in a debate? is the debate the setting? that would be
to 2008 when it went from george w. bush to obama in 2008? is so then using that framework, we did a, i did a road trip over the summer stopping in colorado, iowa, wisconsin, ohio and then later florida, and with that kind of baseline kind of knowledge of who the voters i was looking for, where are the places to go, then it was just, you know, man on the street on steroids. and i was walking around, you know, shopping centers and diners and university campuses and office parks and trying to just get the stories of voters who weren't showing up at campaign rallieses, who were just going about their daily lives and asking them about, you know, how they were thinking about themselves politically, what were the stories that they were paying attention to in the election, what weren't they paying attention to. and from that kind of met some characters that i've since returned to and kind of gotten a sense of how their takes on the race have shifted over the last several months. um, and so, so ity that what is valuable in that it's very, youu know, it's the danger as a reporter, i mean, every
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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